Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 84 However, when examining the percentage of students of Aboriginal Identity scoring in the lowest category (below expectation) there is a 6% drop which also illustrates a closing of the gap in achievement for our students of Aboriginal Identity in this assessment. HRSB Grade 10 students performed above the provincial result in Mathematics 10, however performed slightly lower than the provincial result in Mathematics at Work 10. Overall, improvement is demonstrated in both math assessments for HRSB Grade 10 students. In Mathematics 10, 72% of students scored at or above the expectation which represents a 4% improvement and 54% of students scored at or above the expectation in Mathematics at Work 10, which represents an improvement of 3%. As also demonstrated in the Grade 8 results, there is improvement in mathematics for students of African Ancestry. In Mathematics 10, 54% of students scored at or above the expectation which is a notable improvement of 9% compared to the previous year. When looking at the percentage of students who scored in the lowest category (below expectation) there is a similar closing of the gap in achievement by 8%. Results in Mathematics at Work 10 show a modest improvement of 1% in the number of students scoring at or above the expectation. Both mathematics assessments show improvement for students of Aboriginal Identity. In Mathematics 10, 71% of students scored at or above the expectation which represents an 11% increase. When looking at the percentage of students who scored in the lowest category (below expectation), there was also a decrease of 5% which demonstrates the closing of the gap in achievement. In Mathematics at Work 10, students of Aboriginal Identity outperformed the HRSB overall result by 9%. What are we doing differently? For more than two years, our system priority has been to improve the achievement results of students of African Ancestry and Aboriginal Identity. By using a number of strategies anchored in Culturally Responsive Pedagogy (CRP), we are focused on providing learning experiences that are meaningful for each student. Junior and senior high mathematics teachers have attended professional development to support them in understanding how to incorporate CRP into their teaching practices. As an example, teachers are using data from the students’ communities as the basis of mathematics problems, and they’re designing projects with students’ interests or learning styles in mind. Teachers are also putting a greater focus on effective assessment practices and helping students prepare for assessments. For example, Grade 10 teachers provided students with self-assessments so students can determine gaps in their own understanding and then provided targeted instruction and review to meet each student’s individual needs. African Nova Scotian Student Support Workers and Mi’kmaq/Aboriginal Student Support Workers also provided assistance by reinforcing the importance of the assessments and by making connections with parents and/or guardians. Overall, teachers using CRP strategies are integrating students’ learning styles, prior knowledge and lived experiences into the curriculum every day. These approaches are making the learning more meaningful for students and, based on the results of these assessments, they are having a positive impact on student achievement. Click here to see the full report. continued from page 3 Look what HRSB students participating in WE Schools initiatives have done in the past year!